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Global & Public Health: Home

Wear a Cloth Face Covering to Protect You and Your Friends (CDC)

Do it for Yourself and Your Friends (CDC)

Please wear a face covering (CDC)

When You Can be Around Others After You Had or Likely Had COVID-19 (CDC)

When You Can be Around Others After You Had or Likely Had COVID-19

Updated July 16, 2020
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When you can be around others (end home isolation) depends on different factors for different situations.

Find CDC’s recommendations for your situation below.

I think or know I had COVID-19, and I had symptoms

You can be with others after

  • At least 10 days since symptoms first appeared and
  • At least 24 hours with no fever without fever-reducing medication and
  • Symptoms have improved
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Depending on your healthcare provider’s advice and availability of testing, you might get tested to see if you still have COVID-19. If you are tested, you can be around others when you have no fever, respiratory symptoms have improved, and you receive two negative test results in a row, at least 24 hours apart.

I tested positive for COVID-19 but had no symptoms

If you continue to have no symptoms, you can be with others after:

  • 10 days have passed since test
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Depending on your healthcare provider’s advice and availability of testing, you might get tested to see if you still have COVID-19. If you will be tested, you can be around others after you receive two negative test results in a row, at least 24 hours apart.

If you develop symptoms after testing positive, follow the guidance above for “I think or know I had COVID, and I had symptoms.”

I have a weakened immune system (immunocompromised) due to a health condition or medication. When can I be around others?

People with conditions that weaken their immune system might need to stay home longer than 10 days. Talk to your healthcare provider for more information.  If testing is available in your community, it may be recommended by your healthcare provider.  You can be with others after you receive two negative test results in a row, at least 24 hours apart.

If testing is not available in your area, your doctor should work with an infectious disease expert at your local health department to determine if you are likely to spread COVID-19 to others and need to stay home longer.

For Anyone Who Has Been Around a Person with COVID-19

It is important to remember that anyone who has close contact with someone with COVID-19 should stay home for 14 days after exposure based on the time it takes to develop illness.

Where You Can Get Help

Funeral Guidance for Individuals and Families

Considerations for Public Pools, Hot Tubs, and Water Playgrounds During COVID-19

Considerations for Public Pools, Hot Tubs, and Water Playgrounds During COVID-19

Updated July 15, 2020
 

There is no evidence that COVID-19 can be spread to humans through the use of recreational waters. Follow safe swimming practices along with social distancing and everyday preventative actions to protect yourself.

As public aquatic venues open in some areas, CDC offers the following considerations for the safety of those who operate, manage, and use public pools, hot tubs, and water playgrounds.

Public aquatic venues can be operated and managed by:

  • City or county governments
  • Apartment complexes
  • Membership clubs (for example, gyms)
  • Schools
  • Waterparks
  • Homeowners’ associations

All decisions about implementing these considerations should be made locally, in collaboration with local health officials. Operators of public aquatic venues can consult with local officials to determine if and how to implement these considerations while adjusting them to meet the unique needs and circumstances of the local jurisdiction. Their implementation should also be informed by what is feasible, practical, and acceptable.

How COVID-19 Spreads UPDATED JUNE 16, 2020 (CDC)

Evidence-based resources for health professionals and health organisations - Joanna Briggs Institute

Welcome to the James E. Tobin Library

Welcome! This interactive guide serves as an introduction to resources for Global & Public Health. These are helpful resources that will assist you in obtaining information regarding Public Health.  The electronic resources available to you 24/7, but there are many useful books and print journals available in the James E. Tobin Library, as well. Current Health News have RSS feeds to the CDC and EPA among others.  If you need in-depth reference assistance for a research project, please do not hesitate to contact a librarian by catching us at the reference desk or call (516) 323-3910. You can also IM the subject librarian with Chat Reference.

Happy Researching!

How To Wear Your Mask (CDC)

12 Tips for Grocery Shopping During the Pandemic (FDA)

Wash Your Hands (NYC Health)

Your cloth face covering may protect them. Their cloth face covering may protect you (CDC)

Illustration of people wearing cloth face masks

How To Safely Wear and Take Off a Cloth Face Covering (CDC)

New York State

New Yorkers can call the COVID-19 Emotional Support Hotline at 1-844-863-9314 for mental health counseling.

Coronavirus Hotline 1-888-364-3065

Suffolk County

Suffolk County Hotline 311

Suffolk County residents can have local updates sent to their phones. Text COVIDSUFFOLK to 67283 to be alerted of the latest information, health guidance, and other developments.

New Jersey

Librarian Liaison

Theresa Rienzo's picture
Theresa Rienzo
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Contact:
Theresa A. Rienzo, BSN, RN, MS, MLIS, AHIP

Associate Librarian Health Sciences

James E. Tobin Library

Molloy College

1000 Hempstead Avenue

P.O. Box 5002

Rockville Centre, New York 11571-5002
516-323-3930
Website
UA-42961638-1